21 February 2011

zeddess in digital

Digital design - it's not something I've trained for, so the process has been very experimental, and fun!
Starting with a hand-drawn image scanned into the computer, I can tweak a finished drawing into the final work just with contrast and saturation settings, and voila! I have a design that still has the touch of the handmade, with the refinement of the digital process.  "Cable Girl" was drawn in graphite, hand-coloured in watercolour pencil and then 'digitally enhanced' for the printing process, with consideration for the tshirt colours and the nature of the printing inks.
"Kindred" began as a graphite sketch, that I refined with image editing software GIMP, and then I could add the digital colour with hue and saturation settings, and set the contrast levels to suit printing.

"Go Fish" started as nothing but a hand-drawn outline, and the rest is  completely digital. Using virtual brushes, air brushes and tools, this design exists only in the digital environment. Except of course, for the tshirts and stickers it's printed on.

To see more of my digital designs, check out my Red Bubble gallery at zian.redbubble.com.

20 February 2011

WIP - Abstractions of a Healing Terrier

 I've started work on some quick abstract paintings for a friend's cafe - at this stage, I've applied impasto with a palette knife to get a textured ground, and started with the first layers of colours. Abstracts are more about feeling and mood - the genre was based on the idea that the end result should not resemble anything in life, instead describing emotion and thought, and thus abstract constructions.

In the meantime, Isis became overconfident in her healing limbs, and overdid it with the happy terrier act. Being the terribly conscientious sort, she was rather embarrassed by the fact that she set her therapy back and now has to work with a walking sling again....

17 February 2011

World of Colour, Shades of Grey

Pictured here is the WIP (work in progress) for a composition that was finally titled 'Stained Glass Window'. Behind it was the idea that a life of fine lines created a different perspective, and thus a completely new reality.
On its own, here in plain graphite, the work was appealing through the shading and form alone, and I received a lot of positive commentary from the public, even before it was completely finished.

In the final  composition, I added colour to further divide realities - rose-coloured glasses came to mind as I worked, the expansion of the balance of perception; the extremes of the spectrum and the choice in between.

My reasoning for the use of colour in art is based on its purpose in the overall composition - I rarely make the choice to work in colour for the sake of colour alone. It comes down to whether or not I believe it will make a greater emotional impact; often the softer greys and blacks are dream-like enough that the need for colour is unwarranted, and there's the fact that it allows for the imagination of the audience to add to the image themselves.


In my paintings, I have a greater affinity for colour in the work because painting for me is a different kind of journey. Creating a storybook feel and un-reality through the colour choices that I make allows for emotional values and provocations that I don't achieve with the graphite.... sometimes I feel like two different artists, given the changes in the process for each medium. And then of course there's the fact that colour mixing has far greater possibilities in paint than it does in pencil....